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A Reflection on Luke 24:13-33 by Charmaine Sabey-Corkindale

A Reflection on Luke 24:13-33 by Charmaine Sabey-Corkindale

There are some themes in the Gospel, that are there for us to explore and reflect on:

Eternal presence, to feel the presence rather than to see it. 

Divinity through humility, revelation through faith and Christ with and among us.

Let’s focus now on the road to Emmaus before we take a glance at the meal!

Unbelief is a major motif for Luke’s empty tomb narrative, preparing for the overcoming of doubt via the direct presence of the Risen Lord.  The journey from Jerusalem to Emmaus is characterised by defeat, and the journey back to Jerusalem by witness is victory. The turnabout through Jesus’s instruction takes place on the way. Jesus is more than a powerful prophet as the travellers suggest; but is indeed the fulfilment of the prophetic vision of a suffering and glorified Messiah.

We can see that Luke uses the motif of recognition and non-recognition. As you recall the travellers are kept from recognising Jesus. Although their hearts warmed as Jesus ‘opened up’ the scriptures it was the breaking of bread that was the turning point to recognition.

Now here comes some unusual suggestions…. have you ever seen the two paintings by Rembrandt of the Emmaus supper?  It’s definitely worth looking them up online via Google on a laptop or even a mobile phone! They were painted at different times in his life.  The first: Supper at Emmaus 1629.  Has Jesus seated at a table looking at a man and someone in the background working. We as the onlookers are distanced from the scene.  The second, The Supper at Emmaus 1648. Has Jesus seated facing the viewer, and several people around the table.

The meal in the painting is heavy with significance. The fruit on the table, a glance at the first meal described in Genesis – the eating of fruit and their eyes being opened… that led to creation being subject to decay, futility and sorrow. The first meal after the resurrection, He took the bread blessed it and broke it, then their eyes were opened!

Both have the moment of recognition of Christ amongst them as the central theme. However, it is set differently, and it is interesting to wonder why? Perhaps Rembrandts own life and faith journey has influenced the different styles.

Again, if you are able, it would be good to investigate the painter’s life and other works. He was a person of great faith and drew inspiration from the bible for many of his works. Indeed, he painted Simeon in the temple (recognising the infant Christ) three times! Simeon in the temple 1628, Simeon in the temple 1631 and Simeon’s song of praise 1669 this was his final work and was left unfinished at the time of his death.

This Gospel reading has sorrow, surprise, puzzlement, and then gradual dawning of light. In the second half, unexpected actions, astonished recognition, a flurry of excitement and activity….. surely a model for what being a Christian is all about….

Yesterday today and tomorrow.

Death has been defeated; God’s new creation has dawned.

Jesus himself Risen from the dead, not just alive again but transformed.

So, we too are invited to know Jesus in the breaking of the bread.

Scripture and sacrament joined together.

Reverend Charmaine Sabey-Corkindale

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PAX May 2020

Pax                          MAY  2020

Price:  40p.

The Parish Magazine for the

Benefice of St. Ippolyts with Great and Little Wymondley

VICAR

The Reverend Ginni Dear, The Vicarage, Stevenage Road,

St. Ippolyts SG4 7PE                                                                   01462-237032

                                    Email:  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

CHURCHWARDENS

St. Ippolyts

Michael Hooper, Hillrise, Stevenage Road, St. Ippolyts SG4 7PE     01462-457350

Jane Veasey, Gosmore Cross, Newlands Lane, Gosmore SG4 9BD 01462-434254

Great Wymondley

Cherry Carter, 2 Church Green, Great Wymondley SG4 7HA     01438-724919

Paul Harding, The Old Rectory, Church Green, 

     Great Wymondley SG4 7ES                                                  01438-729219

Little Wymondley

Mike Allardyce, 81 Whitney Drive, Stevenage SG1 4BL              07967-831968

David Palmer, 198 Cleveland Way, Great Ashby, SG1 6BY         01438-367912

Visit our website - www.stippolytschurch.org.uk

SURVIVING LOCKDOWN

By the time you read this, we will have been in lockdown for well over a month.  I’m sure that you, like me, never envisaged this state of being even in your wildest dreams - but yet, here we are.  No doubt, you have also gone through the same range of emotions as I have, from enjoying a much slower pace of life to panic about what the future holds and every conceivable emotion in between!!  I’m very much aware though that lockdown is much easier for me than it is for so many other people and I feel grateful and guilty all at the same time.  I suspect though, that for most of us, the hardest part has been the ‘not knowing’.  Not knowing how long this will continue, not knowing whether we can work or not work, or whether we will have jobs to go back to, not knowing if what we class as ‘normal life’ will ever be the same again, not knowing if a simple thing like going to a shop will put us at risk of catching the virus, and so on.

But as we live with the tension of uncertainty, something else has emerged - thankfulness.  Boy do we have so much to be thankful for!  In amongst all the chaos, have emerged our heroes......our dedicated NHS staff, the shop workers, refuge workers, postal and delivery workers, our teachers and teaching staff, our gardeners, our pubs and restaurants (turned take-away) workers, our emergency services, funeral directors, care home staff and garden centre and home improvement workers......and all those I’ve missed!!!  And the biggest heroes of all - our neighbours!  Especially the ones who keep an eye out for us, shop for us, chat over the fence to us and cheer us on.  

Out of darkness comes new life......out of the dark uncertainty of Covid 19 comes a new reconnection with our shared humanity.  We have realised that we need each other, that we can all play our part, that we all matter - and that really is something to be thankful for!

Doug Richardson, our Lay Leader of Worship has written a lovely reflection on Psalm 46 (see page 4) which I commend to you and which will I hope comfort and encourage you as it did me.

With love - Ginni

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LOCKDOWN vs. VICARS - LET THE BATTLE COMMENCE!!

As I’m sure you are aware by now, it’s not just the shops that have shut during lockdown but also our churches.  This has taken every Vicar I know completely out of their comfort zone and forced them to work out ways of doing church differently.........and that, I feel, is a very good thing even if it is terrifying!!!

So, what have I been up to during lockdown?  Well, spending an awful lot of time on Facebook!!!  All in the line of duty of course!  Our services are now live-streamed from my lounge at 9.15am. on Sundays via Facebook live, so if you have a Facebook account then search for Ginni Dear or St. Ippolyts Church with Great and Little Wymondley and you’ll find me.  I’ve summarised below where you can find information regarding our churches during lockdown - please do find us and join us!

Reverend Ginni can be contacted by:

Email:  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Phone:  01462-237032

Facebook:  Search for Ginni Dear or St. Ippolyts Church with Great 

                   and Little Wymondley and leave a message

Services via Facebook Live:

Morning Prayer at 9.00am. every day from Monday to Thursday

Evening Prayer at 6.00pm. every day from Monday to Thursday

Holy Communion every Sunday at 9.15am.

St. Ippolyts Church website

http://www.stippolytschurch.org.uk/

Any new services or changes to service times will be advertised here.  There will also be a sermon or reflection posted weekly.

We are hoping to host a weekly Café via Zoom along with something to engage with our young people in the near future - see website or Facebook for details.

Future editions of PAX will only be available on the St. Ippolyts Church website (www.stippolytschurch.org.uk) until further notice.  Our regular printer is currently closed and we are also concerned to safeguard those who deliver Pax from door to door.  If you do not have internet access please ask a family member, friend or neighbour to print it and post it to you.  If that is not possible please contact Ginni (as above) or Clare Larsen (01462-453541) and we will do our best to help you.

                                                                                                Ginni

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A WALK THROUGH PSALM 46

Although I am writing this in the second week of April, I am sure that the way we are being asked to live our lives in lockdown will not have changed by the time you come to read this at the beginning of May.

Our churches are closed, and we are not able to meet together for any of our normal church activities.  In fact, apart from immediate family life all social contact is now on hold.

Occasionally we will meet someone on a walk or perhaps have a delivery, and suddenly we find there is someone to talk to, and amazingly they always want to talk back;  strictly at 2 meters of course.  Even the most self-reliant of us have discovered that we are in fact very social creatures. We really do need each other.

This enforced style of living has been easier for some than others.  With access to a garden or even local countryside, some are able to easily take outdoor exercise.  Even then the highlight of the day has often become a home delivery, or perhaps the excitement of a “click and collect” slot.

But for those in medically enforced isolation or for those living in city tower blocks, this will have been a very hard time indeed.  However, our Bible is filled with promises of help from our Heavenly Father for all who trust in him.  With that thought in mind let’s take a short walk through Psalm 46.

The Psalms are the Old Testament hymnbook.  There are 150 of them and they cover the whole range of human feelings and experiences, from dark depression to exuberant joy.  Although they were written for particular circumstances, they remain timeless.  As we read them we find that even in our modern age we are stirred by the same emotions, puzzle over the same fundamental problems of life, cry out in need to the same God as the Psalmist of old.  We find it easy to identify with them.

In reading the Psalms these words of C. S. Lewis are important:

“The Psalms are poems, and poems intended to be sung:  not doctrinal treaties, nor even sermons.  They must be read as poems if they are to be understood.  Otherwise we shall miss what is in them and think we see what is not.”

Psalm 46 begins:

“God is our refuge and strength, a very present help in trouble.  Therefore we will not fear though the earth gives way, though the mountains be moved into the heart of the sea, though its waters roar and foam, though the mountains tremble at its swelling.”

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The Psalmist describes poetically the worst calamity he can picture, with even mountains slipping into the sea.  Things which he had always felt were secure are suddenly gone.

Right now, our own world is suffering a similar vulnerability as so many things we have always taken for granted are disrupted.  The Psalmist is telling us, that even when our own security is suddenly gone, we can seek refuge in God himself.

The psalm continues:

“There is a river whose streams make glad the city of God, the holy habitation of the Most High.  God is in the midst of her;  she shall not be moved;  God will help her when morning dawns.  The nations rage, the kingdoms fall;  He utters his voice, the earth melts.  The Lord of hosts is with us;  the God of Jacob is our fortress.”

Here we have the promise that we don’t have to go far to find our Lord, in fact he is right here with us.  We are reminded of the picture of heavenly perfection described in Revelation chapter 22, where within the new Jerusalem there is “the river of the water of life, as clear as crystal, flowing from the throne of God and of the Lamb down the middle of the great street of the city.”  A very powerful reference to the Spirit of God’s continuing presence amongst us.

The psalm finishes as if God himself is speaking to us:

“Come, behold the works of the Lord, how he has brought desolations on the earth.  He makes wars cease to the end of the earth;  he breaks the bow and shatters the spear;  he burns the chariots with fire.  “Be still and know that I am God.  I will be exalted among the nations, I will be exalted in the earth!”  The Lord of hosts is with us;  the God of Jacob is our fortress.”

God is here describing his power.

So, I hope that as we remain in the middle of this pandemic, this Psalm will remind us that Jesus Christ is God and Lord of history.  Nothing has happened outside of his plan.  Nothing ever leaves him bewildered or astonished.  Nothing ever catches him by surprise.  Those who know Jesus Christ have nothing to fear, even if the coronavirus leads to more catastrophe and confusion our God is our refuge.

As a benefice we praise God for his power and together affirm the central truth of Scripture that he is supremely powerful and will be exalted among the nations.

                                                                                    Doug Richardson

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NEWS FROM THE WYMONDLEYS

ST. MARY’S LITTLE WYMONDLEY

A CHANGE OF MIND

What a difference a month makes, all our service and event plans shelved and social engagements cancelled.  I have always regarded social media as the curse of this century, Facebook and WhatsApp are a mystery to me, I would rather be out in the fresh air than posting tweets or whatever it is everyone seems to do.  I do possess a mobile phone, which, I admit has been useful, but I always forget where I have left it, and if it rings, it’s a frantic hunt for it.  However, in these difficult times we find ourselves in, it is the only way of keeping in touch with family and friends.  Thank goodness Reverend Ginni is up to speed with it all and able to continue her ministry to us all, especially during Holy Week.  Tony and I have managed with her weekly prayers via e-mails, a great comfort.

Similarly, I often come in after a hard day in the garden, back aching, hands like sandpaper, and think wouldn’t it be good just to have a window box, but oh!, I take that back many times over, our garden has been our salvation.  At this time of the year there is much to do, and it is full of green shoots.  We get so much pleasure from seeing seeds germinating, listening to the dawn chorus, enjoying the warmth of the sun.  Our resident robin has quickly caught on that we are now full time gardeners and eagerly waits to join us, being the first one in to survey newly turned earth and harvest any tasty morsels, we are really truly blessed and you will not hear me moan again. 

REASONS TO SMILE:

Standing on the front step every Thursday evening and making lots of noise in recognition of our valiant N.H.S. and front line workers.

Our new neighbours, whom we have hardly spoken to, offering to get us 

    anything we need.

A friendly wave from the postman.

Our local shopkeeper opening extra hours and going 

    out of his way to get what we need.

The kind volunteer who delivers our medication.

Seeing the farm workers busy drilling fields, a sense of things carrying 

    on as normal. 

Luton Airport strangely quiet.  Think how much we are reducing our 

    carbon footprint.

Spring cleaning a cupboard (which has probably missed a spring or two) 

    and discovering a pack of toilet rolls, now that made me chuckle. 

                                                                                    Rosemary Stratton

Please Note:

Future editions of PAX will only be available on the St. Ippolyts Church website www.stippolytschurch.org.uk.  (See note on Page 3).

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ST. MARY’S GREAT WYMONDLEY

CHURCH CLOSURE

The church here was closed on 18th March as were all the churches in the country as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic.

The Annual Parochial Church Meeting and Meeting of Parishioners did not take place on 26th April and will be held at a later date.

In the same way the Service of Blessing for the Community Orchard after the APCM followed by a picnic will not happen because of Social Distancing.

PLANT SALE

The Plant Sale on Church Green will not take place for the same reason.

There may well be the opportunity to buy plants around the middle of May as some have already been sown and propagated.  When the Lock Down is over there may be some plants for sale on the Stall on the Green from time to time.  Please ring Cherry if you are interested.  The number is on the front cover of Pax.

THE FÊTE

Sadly the Fête in June has also been cancelled because of the Covid-19 pandemic.

CHURCH JAM and MARMALADE

The church porch is open every day for sales of Jam and Marmalade and also bottles of Barbecue Sauce donated by Andrew Harding.  There has been a steady stream of walkers and cyclists passing through the churchyard for their daily exercise which has increased sales.  Thank you to everyone who returns empty jars and lids. 

This new season’s fruit is developing well with all the fine weather and we are hoping for abundant crops.

     Stay Safe and Good Wishes to everyone from St. Mary’s PCC

                                                                                        Cherry Carter

Please Note:

Future editions of PAX will only be available on the St. Ippolyts Church website www.stippolytschurch.org.uk.  (See note on Page 3).

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WYMONDLEY BAPTIST CHURCH

Did we ever imagine how much the past weeks would have changed the lives of the whole wide world!  The global outbreak of COVID-19 has impacted the lives of everyone and our hearts and prayers are with all being treated in hospital and for all whose loved ones have lost their lives.

At Chapel we have had regular Sunday morning services since 22nd March and we have Craig Bacon to thank for setting up the Zoom system and enabling us to see and sing and talk to each other and to praise and worship together.  Our preachers have all joined in with us and have delivered their sermons from their homes.  So we give a special thank you to Pauline Wade, Will Andrews, Jonathan Welch, and Sir Les Ebdon.  We look forward to hearing our booked speakers in May.

Sadly Cyril Darley died on 8th April and will not now be receiving his telegram from the Queen on his 100th birthday.  Cyril was a beloved member of our Church as well as being a devoted and loved Father, Grandfather and Great Grandfather. He will be greatly missed but is now in the presence of the King of Kings, where there is joy unspeakable.

Our prayers continue for our Government as they guide us through this Pandemic and we are thankful for the recovery of the Prime Minister.  We pray for all in our village who are feeling lonely at this time.  We are all, I'm sure, busy using our phones, laptops, tablets, mobiles, etc. to keep in touch with each other.  What a blessing social media can be at such times and it has been good for all who have 'Facebook' to see Reverend Ginni's 'Thought for the Day' and other messages.  The wonders of technology mean we can also talk to people thousands of miles away and my son has found that extremely uplifting and helpful speaking to far away friends through the Zoom system.  These times, like Wars, bring us all close together and we have all applauded our NHS as we've joined in at a safe distance on Thursdays in our roads to express our heartfelt thanks.  Of course 8th May is VE Day which reminds us of our deliverance in the 2nd World War and brings to mind the Day of Prayer when George VI called the Nation to prayer.  

We still pray every Tuesday so join us at 7.30pm. as we pray for each other, for the Country, for the sick and bereaved and indeed for the world.  Our hearts are with the friends and family of Mrs. Sue Knight who died on 5th April after just 8 days in hospital.  As a friendly neighbour of mine she will be much missed.

Our preachers in May (on Zoom) are as follows:

3rd             Michael Resta  (All Nations Christian College)

10th           Judith Nugent                                             17th           Doug Richardson

24th           Craig Bacon  (Thanksgiving)                  31st           Pentecost Sunday

Join the Sunday service at 'Church on the Internet'. at 10.30am.  Dial in on

01314-601196 or 02030-512874 and meeting ID 8675752648 (#) use the link https.zoom.us/j8675752648 or download the Zoom app and join using ID8675752648. (any problems phone 07531-081621).

                                                                                         Marjorie McCarley  (01438-727050

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HERE AND THERE

WYMONDLEY PARISH COUNCIL

The Parish Council Meeting and Parish Annual Assembly scheduled for 20th April were cancelled to minimise the potential health risk to members of the public, councillors and staff from Coronavirus/Covid-19.  Arrangements will be made for "virtual" meetings to be held during the remainder of the Coronavirus crisis and the dates for these will be published on the Council's website at www.wymondleypc.org.uk.

The Parish Council and I welcome its new Clerk, Sharon Long, who took over from me on 23rd April.  She can be contacted by post at 23 Ampthill Road, Flitwick, Bedfordshire, MK45 1AZ;  by telephone on 07733-853263;  and by 

e-mail on This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

I will stay on as the Council's Responsible Financial Officer (RFO);  and can be contacted about finance matters on 07963-093441 or by e-mail on This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

                                                                                              Cathy Kerby

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COMMUNITY FACEBOOK AND WHATSAPP GROUPS

Did you know that there is a Facebook group and associated WhatsApp group for St. Ippolyts and Gosmore?  We are using the groups to help people out and to try and stay positive during this time.  There are people on these groups who may be able to help you with shopping, collecting medication, etc. if you are self-isolating.  If you would like to be added to the WhatsApp group, please send me an email.  You can find the Facebook group by searching for “St. Ippolyts” in the Facebook search box.  You will be asked a couple of questions just to confirm that you are connected to St. Ippolyts.  Anyone from the Wymondleys is of course also welcome to join!

If you are self-isolating and don’t use either of these platforms, I will still try to help by posting to these groups on your behalf so please send me a message!

       Best wishes, Cathy Beach

        This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. - 01462-454782

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ST. IPPOLYTS FLOWER FESTIVAL - 29th, 30th and 31st August

We are hoping that the flower festival will go ahead but it will all depend on how the virus develops and government advice closer to the date of the event. 

                                                                                             Mary Hooper

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ST. IPPOLYTS PARISH COUNCIL

The Annual Meeting of St. Ippolyts Parish Council is scheduled for Monday 11th May but at the time of writing the medium to be used has not been agreed.  Please visit website www.stippolyts-parishcouncil.org.uk for updates, for enquiries email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or phone 01462-421409.                                         Pam Skeggs

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NEWS FROM ST. IPPOLYTS

FRIENDS OF ST. IPPOLYTS CHURCH

This message is to say 'Thank you' to Ginni for the daily inspirations which are shared with us all.  Also thank you for the beautiful Good Friday service and the Easter Day Service too.

A 'Thank you' also to our choir master John Edwards who has led the 'Melodic Miracles' for a long time now and we have all very much enjoyed our practise time in the church once a month on a Thursday afternoon.  John had also planned for us to sing an anthem at the Easter Service and we were looking forward to singing this together.  Hopefully we can still sing this at services to be enjoyed when all these strange days have passed. 

'Thank you' to Friends for all the flowers in St. Ippolyts church and for the cleaning which everyone takes part in.

Thank you to everyone who we normally see;  for the smiles, the cheery waves - which are being missed very much as at the moment many of our friends in the village may be isolated and there are current restrictions keeping us apart.

'Thank you' to all those involved in caring for the elderly, needy, and those with special needs and all who are in the NHS and involved with nursing or GP surgeries.

THANK YOU TO EVERYONE - God bless and we will all be together for celebrations soon.

                                                                                           Joan Pinkstone

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ST. IPPOLYTS PARISH HALL

Due to the Government directive regarding the Coronavirus (COVID-19) Pandemic our hall is currently closed to the public.  (Closed from 23rd March). Our March trustees' meeting was done electronically.  Frank Harding was elected Chairman, Pamela Skeggs elected Secretary and Michael Fisher elected Treasurer.  Other trustees are Phil Byford, Barbara Thomas and Carl Watson. Sam Kelly - Bookings Secretary and Kerry McManus - Cleaner. 

2019 was a very active year for our charity with the major project being the conversion of the lighting in the main hall to one based on LED.  We now have a very flexible system, including surrounding coloured mood lighting.  The other major work on the hall was the re-sanding and sealing of the floor.  At the end of the year we said goodbye to Paul Adams a trustee and Mike Skinner caretaker. Carl also took over caretaker duties. 

The final draft of the Report of the Trustees and Unaudited Financial Statement 

for the Year Ended 31st December 2019 was agreed.  This showed the total income generated was £23,340 with outgoings totalling £26,974, giving a deficit £3,634.  This deficit was acceptable as trustees had agreed that with good funds we should undertake necessary projects to improve the hall.  Please visit www.stippolyts-hall.co.uk or www.facebook.com.stippolytsparishhall for updates and for enquiries email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..                               Pam Skeggs

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GOOD NEIGHBOURS

As many of you know my parents live in a tiny hamlet just outside Hexham in Northumberland, it’s a beautiful place, full of peace and quiet.  At the best of times it seems a very long way away from me and my sisters (the nearest is still just over a hundred miles away) and now it seems so much worse.  They have no computer or smart phone but are being very good about self-isolating:  our biggest challenge has been trying to find ways of getting groceries to them. 

So, you can imagine my relief when I received an email from one of their neighbours “We are in touch with most of our neighbours and they have expressed a willingness to help Tom and Jill should the need arise.  We are aware that they are ruggedly independent and reticent to ask for help.  If in your regular conversation with your parents you glean something that is needed please “tip us the wink”.  We would be glad to help either directly or through our neighbours - and no one need ever know!”  A WhatsApp group has been set up and a new neighbour who they barely knew is collecting a paper for them every day (not exactly a necessity but they love their Daily Telegraph!).

It is wonderful to know that people are keeping an eye open for Mum and Dad and that people care about them.  The only problem with all this is my Mum - “we don’t want to be a burden” and “it seems wrong, I’ve always been the one to give help” - too right Mum, you have always been there to give help, it’s one of the reasons everyone is so willing to help you now! 

Like many others at the moment I have been trying to do my bit and I keep hearing Mum’s refrain.  It is always from people who have been in the past, and still are, stalwarts of our community;  they should not feel guilty that in this instance they are the ones receiving help, they have helped so many people in the past!! 

If anyone does need help with shopping, picking up prescriptions or just wants a good old fashioned natter on the phone please get in touch.

    Barbara Thomas - 01462-421641, 07443-228468, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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KEEPING IN TOUCH

At this strange, difficult, and worrying time, we are very grateful for technology and the internet, phone calls, letters and cards, neighbours helping each other out, and time to pause, reflect, prioritise and pray.

I miss going to our lovely church, fellowship, and singing hymns together, but I am grateful for Ginni's daily vlog, her words of comfort and wisdom, and the services from The Vicarage.

It is a great comfort to know we can still pray and worship at the same time, even if we are all doing so from our own homes.

                                                                               Jenny Sheach

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Please Note:  Future editions of PAX will only be available on the St. Ippolyts Church website www.stippolytschurch.org.uk.  (See note on Page 3).

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PARISH CHURCH REGISTERS

ST. IPPOLYTS

Burial of Ashes             9th January:            Nora Irene Pateman

LITTLE WYMONDLEY

Funeral at the Crematorium       18th February:    Betty Joyce Sings

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COVID 19 AND THANKFULNESS - A Reflection

I think most of us know that Ginni is seldom keen to write her contribution to this magazine - unless of course it is to regale you all with stories of all her mother’s failings and misfortunes!  Well, I am her mother and she has asked me to write a contribution this month!  My first reaction - to get my own back?  Second reaction - I don’t do anything much that I could possibly write about.  Then I thought about the little that I am able to do, and realized that in these worrying times most of us are in the same boat.  No one can come and go as they please, the vast majority of us are having to self-isolate.  Self-pity really isn’t an option.

If the weather is fine I can wrap up and go outside, take a little ride on my mobility scooter (I draw the line at rain, however!).  Providing we keep our distance (2 metres) I can even talk (louder than normal because of the distance!) to fellow residents of the retirement complex I live in and I can also be visited by my daughter for an impromptu chat in the gardens.  The grand-children are a different matter, however, so I have to make do with video chats and “virtual” video walks.  They are quite inventive with their “keeping in touch” techniques and I do sometimes have difficulty in responding in kind with their technological knowledge, but they seem to find it quite amusing to painstakingly give me instructions!

I now realise that I am VERY lucky to have the things I have and the ability to do what I do.  Some people have NONE of this.  They have virtually no contact with the outside world, they have no one to phone them or wave through the window at them and the technical ability to communicate via email or the web.

If you are one of these people, then I send you my kind thoughts and very good wishes.  If you are like myself and have limited contact then please be patient and grateful for what you have - there are so many people far worse off than us - it will, I am sure, come right in the end.

    Christine (Ginni’s mum!)

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DEADLINE

Material for the JUNE issue of Pax should reach Clare Larsen, 

24 Ninesprings Way, Hitchin SG4 9NN (tel. 01462-453541 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) by Friday 15th May, please.  Or given to Rosemary Stratton by Tuesday 12th May.

Please Note:  Future editions of PAX will only be available on the St. Ippolyts Church website www.stippolytschurch.org.uk.  (See note on Page 3).

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Revd Ginni's "on line" services

To see Ginni's on line Services visit the St Ippolyts Church with Great and Little Wymondley facebook page

 

https://www.facebook.com/RevGinni/posts/741109420049616

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Bishop Alan's Sermon, Easter 2 19th April 2020

Copy and paste the link below into your browser to see Bishop Alan's service https://drive.google.com/file/d/1O5413WISbT2r58t5z4qhZhC-VQYtbcJQ/view

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Sunday 19th April - Howell's Sermon

Low Sunday 19 Apr 20 20 St George Low Sunday then, low after the high feast of Easter last week. It was sometimes referred to in the Roman Church as Quasimodo Sunday: nothing to do with creeping around the belfry, nor even about Notre Dame de Paris, but rather, just as we often call the Sunday next before Advent 'Stir up Sunday' after the opening words of the Collect (you remember, Stir up, we beseech thee, O Lord, the wills of thy faithful people), similarly Quasimodo Sunday was so called because of the Introit at Mass on this day, which quotes from 1 Peter [2.2]: As newborn babes, desire the sincere milk of the word, that ye may grow thereby. In Latin the opening ‘as newborn babes’ is Quasi modo geniti infantes. So, Quasimodo Sunday. Our prayers today, as daily for the past few weeks, have largely been driven by the current Coronavirus pandemic - and more than a few of us have had a least a touch of the disease. But let's for a moment think of something different, a bit jollier perhaps. Next week, as I'm sure everyone knows, we celebrate not only the birthday of William Shakespeare, born in 1564, and the anniversary of his death in 1616. But also on the same day, of course, St George's Day. Yet, although quite startling to someone brought up with school half-holidays on St David's Day, apparently fewer than one in 5 people in England know that St George is celebrated on 23 April, and allegedly more than a quarter of people living in this country don't know who England's Patron Saint is anyway! But we Church people know, and we can't let the week go by without some mention of St George. Still, we don't know a great deal about him and I'm afraid that the fight with the dragon to save the damsel has as little to do with St George as does being ripped apart by horses with St Hippolytus. Both legends really derive from Greek mythology. But the dragon has a good story and I'll touch on it later. It's difficult to put together an accurate account of George's life because there is so much myth and legend tied in but, from the bits that we do have, it seems fairly certain that he was born in the second half of the third century in Cappadocia, pretty much in the centre of what is now Turkey. His parents were Christian and, when his father died, his mother returned to her native Palestine, taking George with her. He enlisted as a Roman soldier and rose to the rank of Tribune, a senior officer. He was still serving in Palestine (or had returned there) when in 303 and 304 Emperor Diocletian directed the most devastating and sustained persecution of the Early Church. George was said to have torn up a copy of Diocletian's order against Christian soldiers - but, whatever, he was certainly arrested, imprisoned and tortured, but refused to deny his faith. Eventually he was dragged through the streets of Diospolis (now Lydda or Lod) and beheaded. The earliest solid record that we have was by the prolific writer Pope Gelasius (pope between 492 and 496), who observed that George was one of the saints 'whose names are rightly reverenced among us, but whose actions are known only to God'. And that was less than 200 years after George's death, so not much detail there. The first known British reference to George occurs in an account by St Ādamnan, an Irishman who became Abbot of Iona late in the seventh century: he had heard about him from Arcuif, a French bishop who had travelled to Jerusalem and other holy places in Palestine. The Venerable Bede also mentions George and the saint's reputation grew with the returning Crusaders. Indeed, in Fordington (an old village now a suburb of Dorchester) the church has above the south door an old stone carving of a miraculous appearance where, it was claimed, St George had led the crusaders into battle; naturally the church is dedicated to St George, believed to be the first church in England to have been so. Then, in 1222, the Council of Oxford named 23 April as St George's Day. And when Edward II founded the Order of the Garter in about 1348, he put it under the patronage of St George; and Edward IV & Henry VII subsequently built St George's Chapel, Windsor, as the chapel of the order. So from the 14th century then, St George came to be regarded, in England at least, as a special protector of the English; and English soldiers were told to wear 'a sign of St George' on their chest and back: the red cross that is now incorporated into our Union Flag and the White Ensign of the Royal Navy - and, of course, is the flag of the CofE too. The Feast of St George was promoted to principal status after the Battle of Agincourt on St Crispin's Day 1415, when many believed that they had seen him fighting on the English side. But his popularity waned somewhat after the Reformation as religious beliefs changed and even more so as gunpowder became the main weapon of war, and the lance and sword became less significant. So much so that, in 1778, the Roman Catholic Church demoted St George's Day from a feast day to a simple day of devotion - and even that became optional in 1970. Nevertheless, by then, in 1940, King George VI had inaugurated the George Cross: the highest gallantry award for civilians, and for military personnel in actions not in the face of the enemy - in effect a civil version of the Victoria Cross. The reverse of the George Cross depicts George slaying the dragon ... and I promised to rehearse that tale! Much earlier, St George's role was seen as involving verbal jousting and violent suffering rather than knightly adventures and derring do, but in 1483 Caxton printed a book called the Golden Legend - largely a translation of a French collection of fantastic details of saints' lives - and it told the tale of St George and the Dragon. This story goes that, born in Cappadocia as we've heard, George became a knight and went one day to Libya, to a city called Silene (the same place as Cyrene perhaps?). And by this city was a lake in which lived a fierce dragon which terrorized the whole country. At first, the people there had fed the dragon 2 sheep every day so that it wouldn't attack them, but when that eventually failed to satisfy, they gave it a sheep and a human. The king decided that the sacrificial man or woman should be chosen by lot, and this went on until the lot fell upon the king's daughter. The king tried to bargain his way out of the deal, but the people were adamant that the girl should be fed to the dragon just as so many of their children had been. So the poor lass was taken to the lake and left there, alone. But soon, St George just happened to be passing, saw her and asked what was up. She told him and begged him to leave before the dragon arrived and killed him too. To which, in the words of Caxton's book, George replied 'Fair daughter, doubt ye no thing thereof for I will help thee in the name of Jesu Christ.' And she: 'For God's sake, good knight, go your way, and abide not with me, for ye may not deliver me.' At which stage the dragon appeared and rushed towards them for its lunch. George leapt on his horse and attacked the beast with his lance, injuring it severely and driving it to the ground. He then persuaded the girl not to be afraid but to put her girdle around the dragon's neck: it then obediently and quietly followed her as she lead it into the city, where, of course, it caused major panic until George told them all not to be frightened, saying (again according to Caxton's book) 'Ne doubt ye no thing, without more, believe ye in God, Jesus Christ, and do ye to be baptized and I shall slay the dragon.' So, naturally, the king and thousands of his people were baptized right away. George duly killed the dragon and had it dragged out of the city; the king established a church of Our Lady and St George, where a fountain of healing water sprang up; and they all lived happily ever after. And there's a Rossetti watercolour of George marrying the princess! [1864] So there we have it - all we know of St George and a bit extra too. But there is little connection with England per se. Indeed, George became very popular all around, for he's also the Patron Saint of Aragon, Catalonia, Georgia, Lithuania, Palestine, Portugal, Germany and Greece; not to mention the cities of Moscow, Istanbul, Genoa and (with St Mark) Venice. He's also the Patron Saint of soldiers, archers, cavalry and chivalry, farmers and field workers, horse riders and saddlers, and in more recent years, the Scouting movement. But hardly a full-time Anglophile. Scotland enjoys a real apostle as its patron, while Ireland and Wales have their home-grown saints - and celebrate them with enthusiasm. So how about an English saint for England? There's Alphege and Anselm and, obviously, of course, Alban, a Romano-Briton, the first English martyr, executed traditionally in the same Diocletian persecution as was St George, though more recent study indicates that he was martyred either 50 or 90 years earlier. But I don't need to press his case before this congregation ... though ‘Cry, “God for Harry, England and St Alban”’ doesn’t quite have the same ring, does it! Still, St George it is: he's done us well and we should celebrate him. As Pope Gelasius said '[his] name is rightly reverenced among us, but [his] actions are known only to God'. And so to finish, as we sit, let us pray the collect for St George's Day: O God of hosts, who didst so kindle the flame of love in the heart of thy servant George that he bore witness to the risen Lord by his life and death: grant us the same faith and power of love that we, who rejoice in his triumphs, may come to share with him the fullness of the Resurrection: through Jesus Christ thy Son our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with thee, in the unity of the Holy Ghost, one God, now and for ever. Amen. [1772 words] Postscript follows >> Postscript In the earlier days of the pandemic, Ginni's message in Pax opened with the first verse of Psalm 46 as in the Book of Common Prayer: God is our hope and strength, a very present help in trouble]. And how appropriate that remains for us now. A lovely and well-know psalm - and I'll pass on one of those little quirks that are of no real use, but which are quite fun. I learnt it from Inspector Morse! If you count 46 words from the beginning of Psalm 46, and 46 words from the end, just see what you get. You need to use the version in the Authorized Version of the Bible (the psalms in BCP come from the earlier Great Bible of 1539 edited by Myles Coverdale). And don't count the Selah that you will see as a separate word at the very end of the last verse. Actually, Selah appears 71 times at the end of verses in the psalms (and 3 times in the book of Habakkuk), and we don't know exactly what it means, but it's probably either a musical direction or an instruction about the reading of the text, something like 'stop and listen', so stressing the importance of what has gone just before - a bit like Amen perhaps. Anyway, Psalm 46: 46 words from the beginning and 46 words from the end (not counting the Selah). I mentioned the answer in my sermon.

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Evening Prayer

Evening Prayer You may wish to light a candle and have some reflective music playing in the background. The eternal God is your refuge, and underneath are the everlasting arms. Deuteronomy 33.27 Opening Sentences The Lord almighty grant us a quiet night and a perfect end. Amen. Our help is in the name of the Lord who made heaven and earth. Pause and reflect on the day that is past. Save us, O Lord, while waking, and guard us while sleeping, that awake we may watch with Christ and asleep may rest in peace. Psalm A Psalm will be read here and may end with: Glory to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit; as it was in the beginning is now and shall be for ever. Amen. Bible Reading You may wish to use one of the following short readings or choose a passage of your own. These may very during live services. Sunday Evening You, O Lord, are in the midst of us, and we are called by your name; leave us not, O Lord our God. Jeremiah 14.9 Monday Evening Thus said the Lord God, the Holy One of Israel: In returning and rest you shall be saved; in quietness and in trust shall be your strength. Isaiah 30.15 Tuesday Evening Jesus said, ‘Come to me, all you that are weary and are carrying heavy burdens, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you, and learn from me; for I am gentle and humble in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light. Matthew 11.28-end Wednesday Evening Humble yourselves under the mighty hand of God, so that he may exalt you in due time. Cast all your anxiety on him, because he cares for you. 1 Peter 5.6,7 Thursday Evening Jesus said, ‘I have said this to you, so that in me you may have peace. In the world you face persecution. But take courage; I have conquered the world!’ John 16.33 Friday Evening God has destined us not for wrath but for obtaining salvation through our Lord Jesus Christ, who died for us, so that whether we are awake or asleep we may live with him. 1 Thessalonians 5.9,10 Saturday Evening Jesus said, ‘I am the light of the world. Whoever follows me will never walk in darkness but will have the light of life.’ John 8.12 Prayers A period of silence may be kept where you are invited to offer the people and situations you are concerned about to God. The following prayers may be used but could vary in live services. Merciful God, we entrust to your unfailing and tender care this night those who are ill or in pain, knowing that whenever danger threatens your everlasting arms are there to hold us safe. Comfort and heal them, and restore them to health and strength; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen. Be present, O merciful God, and protect us through the silent hours of this night, so that we who are wearied by the changes and chances of this fleeting world, may rest upon your eternal changelessness; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen. Visit this place, O Lord, we pray, and drive far from it the snares of the enemy; may your holy angels dwell with us in peace, and may your blessing be always upon us; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen. The Lord’s Prayer Our Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be thy name; thy kingdom come; thy will be done; on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread. And forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive those who trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation; but deliver us from evil. For thine is the kingdom, the power and the glory, for ever and ever. Amen. The Conclusion In peace we will lie down and sleep; for you alone, Lord, make us dwell in safety. The Lord bless us and watch over us; The Lord make his face to shine upon us and be gracious to us; The Lord look kindly upon us and give us peace. Amen. Materials in this booklet are drawn from Common Worship: Services and Prayers for the Church of England, Common Worship: Pastoral Services, and Common Worship: Daily Prayer, all of which are copyright © The Archbishops' Council of the Church of England.
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Morning Prayer

Morning Prayer

You may wish to light a candle and have some reflective music playing in the background. 

The Lord is good, a strong refuge when trouble comes. God is close to those who trust in him. 

Nahum 1.7 

Opening Sentences 

O Lord, open our lips 

and our mouth shall proclaim your praise. 

The night has passed, and the day lies open before us;

let us pray with one heart and mind. 

Pause for reflection as you offer the day to God. 

As we rejoice in the gift of this new day, so may the light of your presence, O God, set our hearts on fire with love for you; now and for ever. Amen. 

Psalm

A Psalm will be read here

Bible Reading 

You may wish to use the weekly pattern of short readings given below, or choose a passage of your own. There may be different readings for live services.

Sunday Morning 

But now thus says the Lord, he who created you, O Jacob, he who formed you, O Israel: 

Do not fear, for I have redeemed you; I have called you by name, you are mine. 

When you pass through the waters, I will be with you; and through the rivers, they shall not overwhelm you; when you walk through fire you shall not be burned, and the flame shall not consume you. For I am the Lord your God, the Holy One of Israel, your Saviour. 

Isaiah 43.1-3a 

Monday Morning

‘Do not let your hearts be troubled. Believe in God, believe also in me. In my Father’s house there are many dwelling-places. If it were not so, would I have told you that I go to prepare a place for you? And if I go and prepare a place for you, I will come again and will take you to myself, so that where I am, there you may be also. And you know the way to the place where I am going.’ Thomas said to him, ‘Lord, we do not know where you are going. How can we know the way?’ Jesus said to him, ‘I am the way, and the truth, and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me. 

John 14.1-6 

Tuesday Morning 

Finally, beloved, whatever is true, whatever is honourable, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is pleasing, whatever is commendable, if there is any excellence and if there is anything worthy of praise, think about these things. Keep on doing the things that you have learned and received and heard and seen in me, and the God of peace will be with you. 

Philippians 4.8-9 

Wednesday Morning 

Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly; teach and admonish one another in all wisdom; and with gratitude in your hearts sing psalms, hymns, and spiritual songs to God. And whatever you do, in word or deed, do everything in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God the Father through him. 

Colossians 3.16,17 

Thursday Morning 

You are no longer strangers and aliens, but you are citizens with the saints and also members of the household of God, built upon the foundation of the apostles and prophets, with Christ Jesus himself as the cornerstone. In him the whole structure is joined together and grows into a holy temple in the Lord; in whom you also are built together spiritually into a dwelling-place for God. 

Ephesians 2.19-22 

Friday Morning 

Let love be genuine; hate what is evil, hold fast to what is good; love one another with mutual affection; outdo one another in showing honour. Do not lag in zeal, be ardent in spirit, serve the Lord. Rejoice in hope, be patient in suffering, persevere in prayer. 

Romans 19.9-12 

Saturday Morning 

He said to his disciples, ‘Therefore I tell you, do not worry about your life, what you will eat, or about your body, what you will wear. For life is more than food, and the body more than clothing. Consider the ravens: they neither sow nor reap, they have neither storehouse nor barn, and yet God feeds them. Of how much more value are you than the birds! And can any of you by worrying add a single hour to your span of life? If then you are not able to do so small a thing as that, why do you worry about the rest? Consider the lilies, how they grow: they neither toil nor spin; yet I tell you, even Solomon in all his glory was not clothed like one of these. But if God so clothes the grass of the field, which is alive today and tomorrow is thrown into the oven, how much more will he clothe you—you of little faith! And do not keep striving for what you are to eat and what you are to drink, and do not keep worrying. For it is the nations of the world that strive after all these things, and your Father knows that you need them. Instead, strive for his kingdom, and these things will be given to you as well.

Luke 12.22-31 

Prayers 

A period of silence may be kept where you are invited to offer the people and situations you are concerned about to God.  The following prayers may be used but could vary in live services.

Almighty and everlasting God, we thank you that you have brought us safely to the beginning of this day. Keep us from falling into sin or running into danger; order us in all our doings and guide us to do always what is righteous in your sight; through Jesus Christ our Lord.  Amen. 

Keep us, good Lord, under the shadow of your mercy in this time of uncertainty and distress. Sustain and support the anxious and fearful, and lift up all who are brought low; that we may rejoice in your comfort knowing that nothing can separate us from your love in Christ Jesus our Lord. Amen. 

The Lord’s Prayer 

Our Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be thy name; thy kingdom come; thy will be done; on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread. And forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive those who trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation; but deliver us from evil. For thine is the kingdom, the power and the glory, for ever and ever. Amen. 

The Conclusion 

The Lord bless us, and preserve us from all evil, and keep us in eternal life. 

Amen. 

Let us bless the Lord. 

Thanks be to God.

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A message from Revd Ginni regarding Services!!

Dear All Happy Easter!! Christ is Risen! Hallelujah! I hope you managed to have a lovely Easter despite lockdown. Thank you to those of you who managed to join me for some or all of our services during Holy Week and Easter and I'm sorry if you were unable to - I am doing all I can to reach you all either by social media, email or telephone. Please read the following to the end as it contains important information regarding our services. Please check the St Ippolyts Church website www.stippolytschurch.org.uk for up to date details of our live-streamed services. New events will be coming and details will be advertised on the website. All Sunday services will be live-streamed on Facebook at 9.15am. Sermons are available via weekly email or on the website. Morning Prayer - live-steamed every day from Monday - Thursday at 9am Evening Prayer - live-steamed every day from Monday - Thursday at 6pm You can find this by creating a Facebook account and searching for St Ippolyts Church with Great and Little Wymondley. Once on the church page, just wait until the allotted time and then click on the service when it appears. Coming soon...... Weekly Café - grab a cuppa and join us as we meet in our virtual café using Zoom Family Service - a short weekly service for families via Zoom. IMPORTANT - please pass this email on to anyone who might be interested. I have sent it to all those whose email addresses I have but I don't have everyone's. THIS SUNDAY - whilst our main congregation use Common Worship in our services, we have a small but faithful congregation whose preference is to use the Book of Common Prayer. So this Sunday, especially for them, our 9.15am service will use the Book of Common Prayer. Sermons - Please find attached a fabulous sermon for this Sunday written by our Reader Howell Davies. There is also quite a nice one from our lovely Bishop Alan too! Weekday Services - Please find attached revised services of Morning and Evening Prayer for your use either at home or during our live-streamed services on Facebook. Phew, I think that's it!! I do hope you are well and staying safe. Please do feel free to ring or email me and for those of you on Facebook, you can message me on Messenger. I'll be keeping you all in my thoughts and prayers. Much love Ginni

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Easter Window from James and Briony Beach.

Another Easter Window, well done to James and Briony

 

200407 James and Briony Beach Easter Window

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Palm Sunday Sermon by Revd Paul Lanham

Palm Sunday 2020

Matt xxi.8. A great multitude spread their garments in the way.

            'All the world's a stage and all the men & women merely players; they have their exits and their entrances'. Shakespeare could almost have written that about the events of Holy Week which we commemorate at this time. We witness a huge drama spread over several days with many people taking part. There are the major figures: Jesus (above all), Pontius Pilate, Annas & Caiaphas dominate the scene. Then there are those merely with walk on parts. Simon of Cyrene who was pressed into carrying Christ's cross. He had come all the way from North Africa, now he was unclean, unable to take part in the Passover Festival - but he became a follower after the crucifixion. Joseph of Arimathea who gave Christ his tomb; he was someone of importance who privately cared about Christ & what He stood for. The penitent thief. I am sure that the two who were crucified with Jesus were terrorists, followers of that Barabbas who lived as Jesus died – how ironical that scenario is. Judas Iscariot, the enigma, surely the most fascinating figure of the entire Bible; there is infinitely more in his betrayal of Jesus than the Bible would imply. 

            Then there is the CROWD. They play a significant role in the Passion narrative and without them Christ could never have been crucified. Instead of taking the usual Biblical line, let's look at them more realistically. Jesus comes into Jerusalem on a donkey, mocking the generals who entered Rome triumphantly on a white charger surrounded by their troops and followed by the slaves they had captured. Jesus by contrast comes into the Holy City in peace on this symbol of humility, an ordinary looking man on a beast of burden. To us 2000 years ago it is full of meaning, but to others it is very different. Jerusalem is bursting with pilgrims. The threat of civil disobedience is at its highest, the Roman occupying forces are terrified of open rebellion. This could be the spark that sets off a riot that they are unable to control. But to make a move against this demonstration would be to risk greater trouble. They can only watch and hope.

As for the crowd, they are bored, looking for something to do, some form of entertainment. Then along comes this carpenter and His followers, mocking the Roman Triumph. It's always entertaining to mock authority and this is worth watching. Worth joining in, by tearing down branches, shouting what the disciples were shouting even if they don't mean what they are saying. To them the Triumphal Entry is no more than street theatre, a means of killing time. Jesus is relieving their boredom for a bit. They can have no idea that they are unwittingly taking part in the prelude to the greatest event, the greatest tragedy in human history – but whoever heard of a street entertainer being the centre of such an event.

Jesus enters Jerusalem – and He does two acts that make Calvary inevitable. First He cleanses the Temple, antagonizing the Jewish authorities and hitting them where it most hurts – in their pockets. Then He just teaches. This second act does three things; it's the most under-rated action in the tragedy. First, by teaching His own brand of religion where the Jews teach a completely different one, He antagonises them even further (if that were possible).  Second He shows Judas Iscariot (who was surely at heart a terrorist, a member of the Sicarii, the People of the Dagger) that He was not going to start the revolution that he joined the Twelve to be a part of; the betrayal of Jesus that follows is because Jesus has betrayed him. Third, He stops entertaining the crowd. He has become boring, they have no further use for Him.

It just needs one final element to set the tragedy into its final stages – someone who can whip up the crowd and turn them into the force that will ensure that Jesus is condemned to death. For the crowd have the power to blackmail Pilate into condemning Jesus to death; they can potentially cause a riot that will end the career of the ruthlessly ambitious governor. Pilate knows it and he will do anything to prevent it. Annas and Caiaphas also know this, and they know that they can also use the crowd to assert their power over Pilate once and for all. So Jesus also becomes a pawn in a power struggle over who really rules Israel. It's a fascinating scenario, a struggle also between two types of looking at life, between evil and good, materialism and spirituality, selfishness and self-giving. And the crowd, utterly disillusioned by Jesus bring everything to a head. Having proclaimed Him as Messiah they no longer need Him. They can bay for His blood, stirred up by an orator – because this too is street theatre, albeit of a much more sinister type. They can be swayed, they can be swept along by hysteria, they can get things done without realising the long term effects of them (I can't help rightly or wrongly seeing a parallel between this mass hysteria and the Nazi rallies at Nuremburg). The crowd hold the reins of power, not that they know it – and they are fickle.

It is the crowd that ultimately condemn Jesus to death. Without them Jesus could not have been condemned. Obviously they weren't the most guilty in Christ's condemnation but they played their part. In that passage that we read every Christmas, St John writes that 'the light shines in the dark & the darkness has never quenched it'. This lies near the heart of what Christ's Passion really means. It is a conflict between darkness and light, evil and good. On the one side there are Annas and Caiaphas, Pilate, the crowd and everything they represent. On the other side there is Christ the Son of God and everything that He stood for. Superficially it seems at Calvary that evil has conquered good, but in the Resurrection we see that good can never be conquered, that love will conquer hatred, light will conquer darkness. In order to have Easter there must first be Calvary, but on the cross Christ condemns everything that the world stands for. The ambition of Pilate, the hypocrisy and machinations of the priests, the fickleness and selfishness of the crowd, the materialism of the world as a whole. They are held to account as Jesus stumbles along the Via Dolorosa, and in dying He passes God's verdict on them. 

But it lies deeper even than this. I am fascinated by the trial of Jesus by Pilate. It is far too complicated to go into detail, but we see in Pilate's misunderstanding of Our Lord's Kingship the same misunderstanding that the crowd had at the Triumphal Entry, that the Jews had as they dreamed of the Messiah who would make Israel great again. 'My Kingdom is not of this world' Our Lord declares to the governor. Pilate can't understand because he thinks on a different level to Christ. Our Lord taught the priority of humility, of love, of unselfishness. Blessed are the poor in spirit, blessed are those who mourn, blessed are the meek. These are the values of the Kingdom, these are what He represents. So the cross becomes Christ's throne, His robes the tattered garments in which He died. Here He passes judgement on the world, but in doing so He shows His love even for those who others would see as His enemies. His spirit must be in us, as once again in spirit we walk the lonely path to Golgotha. Paul writes to the Philippians, 'Let this mind be in you which was also in Christ Jesus, Who being in the form of God thought it not robbery to be equal with God. But made himself of no reputation, & took upon Him the form of a servant & was made in the likeness of men. And being found in fashion as a man He humbled Himself and became obedient even unto death, death on the cross. Wherefore God also hath highly exalted Him and given Him a name which is above every name, that at the name of Jesus every knee should bow'. Christ reigns from the cross, the cross is the expression of everything for which He stands. The grief of Calvary leads as inevitably as anything could lead to the joy of the empty tomb and everything for which it stands. In pondering it we see His love for us and for the world; 

The Reverend Paul Lanham 

 we also see a challenge which as His followers we cannot avoid.    

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Night Prayer, 21:00 see Revd Ginni's video blog at this time

Night Prayer

You may wish to light a candle and have some reflective music playing in the background. 

The eternal God is your refuge, and underneath are the everlasting arms. 

Deuteronomy 33.27 

Opening Sentences 

The Lord almighty grant us a quiet night and a perfect end. Amen. 

Our help is in the name of the Lord 

who made heaven and earth. 

Pause and reflect on the day that is past. 

Save us, O Lord, while waking, and guard us while sleeping, that awake we may watch with Christ and asleep may rest in peace. 

Bible Reading 

You may wish to say here the psalm given below, or Psalm 27, or another chosen psalm. 

Psalm 91 

1 Whoever dwells in the shelter of the Most High 

and abides under the shadow of the Almighty, 

2 Shall say to the Lord, ‘My refuge and my stronghold, ︎ 

my God, in whom I put my trust.’ 

3 For he shall deliver you from the snare of the fowler ︎ 

and from the deadly pestilence. 

4 He shall cover you with his wings 

and you shall be safe under his feathers; 

his faithfulness shall be your shield and buckler. 

5 You shall not be afraid of any terror by night, 

nor of the arrow that flies by day; 

6 Of the pestilence that stalks in darkness, 

nor of the sickness that destroys at noonday. 

7 Though a thousand fall at your side 

and ten thousand at your right hand, 

yet it shall not come near you. 

8 Your eyes have only to behold ︎ 

to see the reward of the wicked. 

9 Because you have made the Lord your refuge 

and the Most High your stronghold, 

10 There shall no evil happen to you, 

neither shall any plague come near your tent. 

11 For he shall give his angels charge over you, 

to keep you in all your ways. 

12 They shall bear you in their hands, 

lest you dash your foot against a stone. 

13 You shall tread upon the lion and adder; 

the young lion and the serpent you shall trample underfoot. 

14 Because they have set their love upon me, 

therefore will I deliver them; ︎ 

I will lift them up, because they know my name. 

15 They will call upon me and I will answer them; 

I am with them in trouble, 

I will deliver them and bring them to honour. 

16 With long life will I satisfy them 

and show them my salvation. 

Glory to the Father and to the Son 

and to the Holy Spirit; 

as it was in the beginning is now 

and shall be for ever. Amen. 

You may wish to use one of the following short readings or choose a passage of your own. 

Sunday Evening 

You, O Lord, are in the midst of us, and we are called by your name; leave us not, O Lord our God. 

Jeremiah 14.9 

Monday Evening 

Thus said the Lord God, the Holy One of Israel: In returning and rest you shall be saved; in quietness and in trust shall be your strength. 

Isaiah 30.15 

Tuesday Evening 

Jesus said, ‘Come to me, all you that are weary and are carrying heavy burdens, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you, and learn from me; for I am gentle and humble in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light.

Matthew 11.28-end 

Wednesday Evening 

Humble yourselves under the mighty hand of God, so that he may exalt you in due time. Cast all your anxiety on him, because he cares for you. 

1 Peter 5.6,7 

Thursday Evening 

Jesus said, ‘I have said this to you, so that in me you may have peace. In the world you face persecution. But take courage; I have conquered the world!’      John 16.33 

Friday Evening 

God has destined us not for wrath but for obtaining salvation through our Lord Jesus Christ, who died for us, so that whether we are awake or asleep we may live with him. 

1 Thessalonians 5.9,10 

Saturday Evening 

Jesus said, ‘I am the light of the world. Whoever follows me will never walk in darkness but will have the light of life.’ 

John 8.12 

Prayers 

Merciful God, we entrust to your unfailing and tender care this night those who are ill or in pain, knowing that whenever danger threatens your everlasting arms are there to hold us safe. Comfort and heal them, and restore them to health and strength; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen

Be present, O merciful God, and protect us through the silent hours of this night, so that we who are wearied by the changes and chances of this fleeting world, may rest upon your eternal changelessness; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.  

Visit this place, O Lord, we pray, and drive far from it the snares of the enemy; may your holy angels dwell with us in peace, and may your blessing be always upon us; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen. 

The Lord’s Prayer 

Our Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be thy name; thy kingdom come; thy will be done; on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread. And forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive those who trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation; but deliver us from evil. For thine is the kingdom, the power and the glory, for ever and ever. Amen. 

The Conclusion 

In peace we will lie down and sleep; 

for you alone, Lord, make us dwell in safety. 

The Lord bless us and watch over us; 

The Lord make his face to shine upon us and be gracious to us; 

The Lord look kindly upon us and give us peace. Amen. 

Materials in this booklet are drawn from Common Worship: Services and Prayers for the Church of EnglandCommon Worship: Pastoral Services, and Common Worship: Daily Prayer, all of which are copyright © The Archbishops' Council of the Church of England.

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EASTER WEEK Morning Prayer at 09:00 See Revd Ginni's Video blog on Facebook

Morning Prayer

You may wish to light a candle and have some reflective music playing in the background. 

The Lord is good, a strong refuge when trouble comes. God is close to those who trust in him. 

Nahum 1.7 

Opening Sentences 

O Lord, open our lips 

and our mouth shall proclaim your praise. 

The night has passed, and the day lies open before us;

let us pray with one heart and mind. 

Pause for reflection as you offer the day to God. 

As we rejoice in the gift of this new day, so may the light of your presence, O God, set our hearts on fire with love for you; now and for ever. Amen. 

Psalm

A Psalm will be read here

Bible Reading 

You may wish to use the weekly pattern of short readings given below, or choose a passage of your own. 

Sunday Morning 

But now thus says the Lord, he who created you, O Jacob, he who formed you, O Israel: 

Do not fear, for I have redeemed you; I have called you by name, you are mine. 

When you pass through the waters, I will be with you; and through the rivers, they shall not overwhelm you; when you walk through fire you shall not be burned, and the flame shall not consume you. For I am the Lord your God, the Holy One of Israel, your Saviour. 

Isaiah 43.1-3a 

Monday Morning

‘Do not let your hearts be troubled. Believe in God, believe also in me. In my Father’s house there are many dwelling-places. If it were not so, would I have told you that I go to prepare a place for you? And if I go and prepare a place for you, I will come again and will take you to myself, so that where I am, there you may be also. And you know the way to the place where I am going.’ Thomas said to him, ‘Lord, we do not know where you are going. How can we know the way?’ Jesus said to him, ‘I am the way, and the truth, and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me. 

John 14.1-6 

Tuesday Morning 

Finally, beloved, whatever is true, whatever is honourable, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is pleasing, whatever is commendable, if there is any excellence and if there is anything worthy of praise, think about these things. Keep on doing the things that you have learned and received and heard and seen in me, and the God of peace will be with you. 

Philippians 4.8-9 

Wednesday Morning 

Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly; teach and admonish one another in all wisdom; and with gratitude in your hearts sing psalms, hymns, and spiritual songs to God. And whatever you do, in word or deed, do everything in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God the Father through him. 

Colossians 3.16,17 

Thursday Morning 

You are no longer strangers and aliens, but you are citizens with the saints and also members of the household of God, built upon the foundation of the apostles and prophets, with Christ Jesus himself as the cornerstone. In him the whole structure is joined together and grows into a holy temple in the Lord; in whom you also are built together spiritually into a dwelling-place for God. 

Ephesians 2.19-22 

Friday Morning 

Let love be genuine; hate what is evil, hold fast to what is good; love one another with mutual affection; outdo one another in showing honour. Do not lag in zeal, be ardent in spirit, serve the Lord. Rejoice in hope, be patient in suffering, persevere in prayer. 

Romans 19.9-12 

Saturday Morning 

He said to his disciples, ‘Therefore I tell you, do not worry about your life, what you will eat, or about your body, what you will wear. For life is more than food, and the body more than clothing. Consider the ravens: they neither sow nor reap, they have neither storehouse nor barn, and yet God feeds them. Of how much more value are you than the birds! And can any of you by worrying add a single hour to your span of life? If then you are not able to do so small a thing as that, why do you worry about the rest? Consider the lilies, how they grow: they neither toil nor spin; yet I tell you, even Solomon in all his glory was not clothed like one of these. But if God so clothes the grass of the field, which is alive today and tomorrow is thrown into the oven, how much more will he clothe you—you of little faith! And do not keep striving for what you are to eat and what you are to drink, and do not keep worrying. For it is the nations of the world that strive after all these things, and your Father knows that you need them. Instead, strive for his kingdom, and these things will be given to you as well. 

Luke 12.22-31 

Prayers 

A period of silence may be kept where you are invited to offer the people and situations you are concerned about to God

Almighty and everlasting God, we thank you that you have brought us safely to the beginning of this day. Keep us from falling into sin or running into danger; order us in all our doings and guide us to do always what is righteous in your sight; through Jesus Christ our Lord.  Amen. 

Keep us, good Lord, under the shadow of your mercy in this time of uncertainty and distress. Sustain and support the anxious and fearful, and lift up all who are brought low; that we may rejoice in your comfort knowing that nothing can separate us from your love in Christ Jesus our Lord. Amen. 

The Lord’s Prayer 

Our Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be thy name; thy kingdom come; thy will be done; on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread. And forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive those who trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation; but deliver us from evil. For thine is the kingdom, the power and the glory, for ever and ever. Amen. 

The Conclusion 

The Lord bless us, and preserve us from all evil, and keep us in eternal life. 

Amen. 

Let us bless the Lord. 

Thanks be to God.

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Daily video blog from Revd Ginni!!

Have you caught up with Revd Ginni's daily (well not everyday) video blog on Facebook. these are already a local sensation with as many as 600 views in a day. Don't miss out, tune in to see what is turning on our Vicar during these strange times.

Just log into your Facebook account, click on "find friends", type in Ginni Dear and Hey Presto you are there!

Enjoy her thoughts for the day!

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Easter Window decoration from Alex Loftus

We  have had our first decorated window photo, this is from Alex Loftus of St Ippolyts School.

 

Well done Alex it is brilliant.

 

200403 Alex Loftus Easter Window

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Revd Ginni - Decorate your window for Easter!

With Easter nearly upon us what are we going to do when we cannot even go to our church?

Revd Ginni invites us all to decorate our window for Easter and then take a photo of your decorated window and send to Revd Ginni. 

There will be a prize for the best decorated window (bet it is some chocolate!!) 

The best photos will be put on this web site for all to see.

 

Happy Easter!!

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EASTER LILIES

EASTER LILIES

If you have donated money for Easter Lilies this will be put aside for next year.

                                                                                Jane Veasey

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A Message from Revd Ginni

This is a message from Revd Ginni written before the Government lock down

 

A MESSAGE FROM GINNI

 

Dear Friends, ‘God is our hope and strength, a very present help in trouble.’ (Psalm 46) The global outbreak of COVID-19 is having an unprecedented impact on our way of life, and the Church is no exception. Following advice from the Archbishops of Canterbury and York, public services at St. Ippolyts Church and St. Mary’s Churches in Great and Little Wymondley on Sundays and on all other days of the week are suspended until further notice. This does not, however, mean that our churches are closed: far from it. No matter what happens, the church continues in each of us: our calling is always to worship our Lord Jesus Christ who is forever faithful, and to love and serve each other. This crisis calls us to model a different way of being the church and we are putting the following in place to enable us to do that: I will continue to celebrate the Eucharist on Sunday mornings, on behalf of the Benefice, at 9.15am. in St. Ippolyts church, joined by either Reverend Paul Lanham, our Reader Howell Davies or Lay Leader of Worship Doug Richardson, as they are able; to pray for our parish and for its people, for our world, and for the sick and the departed. The celebration of the Eucharist is the most powerful form of prayer and is at the heart of our life as a church; it will continue even though it is not open for others to attend. If you have any specific prayer requests please let me know. At 9.15am. each Sunday the bell of the church will be rung as it always is as a call to prayer. At some point between 9.15am. and 10.15am., if you can, please stop what you are doing and pray, perhaps by using the prayer booklet (mentioned below) and by offering your own prayers, so that as a church we continue to worship together. In addition to Sundays, I will also continue to say Morning and Evening Prayer on behalf of the parishes each day but again these services will not be open to others to attend. A short booklet with prayers for use at home, the weekly readings, and worship resources for use with children will be circulated in due course. I am also looking into ways to make some sermons/reflections available via the website, e-mail and social media. 2   Use of the church building Although we cannot congregate together, St. Ippolyts Church and St. Mary’s Church, Great Wymondley will be open for private prayer each day as usual. Practicalities in locking and unlocking prohibit this at St. Mary’s, Little Wymondley. Obviously people will be expected to observe proper hygiene and social distancing. If you are not self-isolating, please do make good use of our wonderful church buildings for prayer and reflection. Keeping in touch I will aim to make available readings, reflections, prayer resources and regular updates as we respond to this changing situation through e-mail and by posting on our website and social media. If you are not on our e-mail list or are unable to access a computer then please let me know. All three parishes in the Benefice have a remarkable church family and I know that we will show the love of God by caring for one another at this extremely challenging time, and that we will also find strength in God our Father who loves us more than we can imagine and who sustains us in all our difficulties. As your parish priest and your friend I am always available for a conversation or pastoral support - please do not hesitate to contact me by e-mail or on the number below. I greatly look forward to the time when we can once more gather together for worship, but for now I end with a prayer that I hope will bring some comfort and hope at this time. Keep us, good Lord, under the shadow of your mercy in this time of uncertainty and distress. Sustain and support the anxious and fearful, and lift up all who are brought low; that we may rejoice in your comfort knowing that nothing can separate us from your love in Christ Jesus our Lord. Amen. With my love and prayers, Ginni (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) (01462-237032)

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Weekly Pew Sheet - 29th March 2020

.200329 Red Sheet Redemptorist A4 RED j f m 2020 13

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Coronavirus - Need Help?

Following the advice from the Government and at direction from the Diocese of St Albans we have had to close the church until further notice. Revd Ginni can be contacted on This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Within our community there are those who wish to help those who need it. Please see the following notice -

Need help?

Search for “St Ippolyts” group and join us on facebook

Not on facebook? Email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. to find out about our Whats App group and phone list for those not online

These groups are for people living in or associated with St Ippolyts. Hopefully we can create a virtual community helping each other, and assist our neighbours who are not online.

STAY SAFE!!

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CORONAVIRUS - A message from Revd Ginni

Dear Friends, 

‘God is our hope and strength, a very present help in trouble’ (Psalm 46) 

The global outbreak of COVID-19 is having an unprecedented impact on our way of life, and the Church is no exception. Following advice from the Archbishops of Canterbury and York, public services at St Ippolyts Church and St Mary’s Churches in Great and Little Wymondley on Sundays and on all other days of the week are suspended until further notice. 

This does not, however, mean that our churches are closed: far from it.  No matter what happens, the church continues in each of us: our calling is always to worship our Lord Jesus Christ who is forever faithful, and to love and serve each other. This crisis calls us to model a different way of being the church and we are putting the following in place to enable us to do that: 

I will continue to celebrate the Eucharist on Sunday mornings, on behalf of the Benefice, at 9.15am in St Ippolyts church, joined by either Revd Paul Lanham, our Reader Howell Davies or Lay Leader of Worship Doug Richardson, as they are able; to pray for our parish and for its people, for our world, and for the sick and the departed. The celebration of the Eucharist is the most powerful form of prayer and is at the heart of our life as a church; it will continue even though it is not open for others to attend. If you have any specific prayer requests please let me know. 

At 9.15am each Sunday the bell of the church will be rung as it always is as a call to prayer. At some point between 9.15am and 10.15am, if you can, please stop what you are doing and pray, perhaps by using the prayer booklet (mentioned below) and by offering your own prayers, so that as a church we continue to worship together. 

In addition to Sundays, I will also continue to say Morning and Evening Prayer on behalf of the parishes each day but again these services will not be open to others to attend.  

A short booklet with prayers for use at home, the weekly readings, and worship resources for use with children will be circulated in due course. I am also looking into ways to make some sermons/reflections available via the website, e-mail and social media. 

Use of the church building 

Although we cannot congregate together, St Ippolyts Church and St Mary’s Church, Great Wymondley will be open for private prayer each day as usual.  Practicalities in locking and unlocking prohibit this at St Mary’s, Little Wymondley.  Obviously people will be expected to observe proper hygiene and social distancing.  If you are not self-isolating, please do make good use of our wonderful church buildings for prayer and reflection. 

Keeping in touch

I will aim to make available readings, reflections, prayer resources and regular updates as we respond to this changing situation through e-mail and by posting on our website and social media. If you are not on our e-mail list or are unable to access a computer then please let me know.  

All three parishes in the Benefice have a remarkable church family and I know that we will show the love of God by caring for one another at this extremely challenging time, and that we will also find strength in God our Father who loves us more than we can imagine and who sustains us in all our difficulties.  

As your parish priest and your friend I am always available for a conversation or pastoral support – please do not hesitate to contact me by e-mail or on the number below. I greatly look forward to the time when we can once more gather together for worship, but for now I end with a prayer that I hope will bring some comfort and hope at this time. 

Keep us, good Lord,  
under the shadow of your mercy in this time of uncertainty and distress. 

Sustain and support the anxious and fearful,
and lift up all who are brought low;
that we may rejoice in your comfort
knowing that nothing can separate us from your love
in Christ Jesus our Lord. Amen. 

With my love and prayers, 

Ginni

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

01462 237032

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